Play To Your Strengths

PLAYING TO OUR STRENGTHS

When I get introduced to new people, friends mention that I played center for Rowan University. Almost every single time, people say…

“You’re pretty short for center.”

When I played in high school, I’d play anywhere from the point guard, to the center. Every single summer, I’d spend hours and hours shooting jump shots, working on ball handling, quickness, and stamina, and basically did anything possible to turn into a guard. By the time my senior season came around, I felt prepared to play point-center if I had to.

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I was wrong. The moment I was put in as point guard, I knew that I’d never feel comfortable handling the ball again.

I just wasn’t good at it.

But I ignored it.

The universe was telling me to be a forward/center, but my mind was telling me to be a guard. I shot 300 shots each afternoon, ran a few miles a day, and spent countless hours doing ball handling drills, hoping to become a guard.

If there’s anything anything I’ve learned from my four years, it’s to play to my strengths.

One day, I received some great advice from a childhood friend/fellow Prof athlete.

He said, “Whatever you do, play to your strengths. As long as you do that, you’ll be fine.” 

Why do people work on the things they’re not, instead of developing the things that they’re great at? Image

Most things in life operate in team settings. Whether it be your family, work or friends. What we should do is utilize our strengths and focus them toward the team goals.

Every time we go to work, step on the court, or stroll onto the field, we go to war. Our teammates are our soldiers fighting along-side us. Our team is our army. The overall goal: to maximize our abilities as a unit.

The true essence of teamwork.

In war (much like football), if the army sends enforcements toward the left, the right is weakened. If enforcements are sent to the front, the rear is weakened, or vice-versa. But if we focus our enforcements to each side…

Everywhere is weakened. 

But what if we focus on becoming well-rounded? Does it work the same way?

Future employer may ask: Where are your strengths? And inevitably, where are your weaknesses?

It’s important to know your weaknesses as well your strengths.

Everyone has potential in something. And yet, some people are more successful than others. The trend that we’ve found is that  the most successful people are the ones who’ve been able to maximize their strengths. 

For all we know, we may have all the skills in the world to become great at something we are truly gifted in. If we deny ourselves of this possibility, it means that we are less concerned with our strengths, and more concerned with concealing our weaknesses. 

Playing to your strengths means that you know what you are, and you know what you aren’t. And if we focus on being good at everything, we won’t become great at anything.

So stop with trying to be great at everything. It’s impossible, and foolish. Try to find what you love, and know your weaknesses just as well as you know your strengths.

If you stay within yourself, it makes things much easier.

Yes, it’s great to be a well-rounded person, but…

When we put our weaknesses above our strengths, our strengths become nothing but great potential.

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